Patrin by Theresa Kishkan

patrin-kishkanNever before has a book—much less a literary novella—had such an impact on my sense of place. Patrin’s European travels as a young woman, her homecoming to Victoria, and then her journey to find traces of her family and heritage in Czechoslovakia simultaneously conjured within me an intense wanderlust, a fierce sense of belonging, and an acute yearning for home. Not only that, it made me thankful for the strong relationships I have with my family—especially my grandparents—and grateful that I have never had to question where I come from (something that I’ve never had cause to consider). Packaged in a gorgeously crafted narrative that often reads more like poetry than prose, this little tale will stay with me for much longer than the ninety minutes it took for me to absorb.

No. 11 on my challenge, though technically it was a gift. Good thing, too, because I don’t know that I’d be able to return it. This one has found a forever home on my shelf.

Quoted: All My Friends are Superheroes

Okay, there’s this thing you can do, a thing you can do like no other person on this planet. That makes you special, but being special really doesn’t mean anything. You still have to get dressed in the morning. Your shoelaces still break. Your lover will still leave you if you don’t treat her right.

The Tiny Wife by Andrew Kaufman

TheTinyWife.AndrewKaufman

I’m 100% convinced that everything Andrew Kaufman writes is pure gold. Absolutely genius. I don’t know how he’s able to say so much about love in such a short book, but he is incredibly successful in doing so.

No. 14 on my challenge. Thank goodness—it would have been terrible for Nancy if she’d had to run from that lion in the winter time.