Quoted: Love in the Time of Cholera

Human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.

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Quoted: NW

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What is the fear? It is something to do with death and time and age. Simply: I am eighteen in my mind I am eighteen and if I do nothing if I stand still nothing will change. I will be eighteen always. For always. Time will stop. I’ll never die. Very banal, this fear. Everyone has it these days.

 

Undermajordomo Minor by Patrick deWitt

UndermajordomoMinor.deWittI, like most everyone else, was a big fan of deWitt’s runaway hit (heh, that rhymed) The Sisters Brothers, so my expectations for the follow-up were of average height—which, for a shorty like me, is pretty high. Now, it’s not that this meandering little tale didn’t meet my average/high expectations, but it didn’t exceed them, either. So while I did ultimately enjoy the book, I don’t think deWitt was as successful in reinventing the gothic novel as he was in reinventing the classic western (Eli Sisters was just such a great character on which to lay the burden of reinvention, and I would not say the same of Lucy Minor). But credit where credit is due: he did give it the old college try.

No. 7 on my challenge. Published by Toronto’s House of Anansi Press and written by a Vancouver Islander (turned Oregonian).

PS. There’s a bit in the middle I did not expect… and neither will you. You have been warned.

Book roundup!

I love books and I love lists, so what better way to celebrate the end of the year than with a bunch of Best Books of 2015 lists (a two column bulleted list that I coded myself, I might add):

 

 

 

 

 

 

And from Brooklyn Magazine, a list much like my own: The Best of the Bests: Ranking the 2015 Best Books Lists.

Finally, to commemorate the near end of my book challenge (I’m working on the last three books as you read), here’s an exhaustive gallery of the books I read in 2015 (including those not read for the challenge), in no particular order (my apologies, the covers aren’t linked to their reviews—I couldn’t figure out how to code around that particular impossibility in gallery view):

Born Weird by Andrew Kaufman

BornWeird.AndrewKaufman.

Honestly, I’m not sure how he manages to do it—to weave magical realism so seamlessly with morality and truth—but he does it so convincingly that it takes a minute to understand what he’s writing about. He’s a genius.

No. 7 on my challenge. I only just discovered Kaufman last year, but he’s quickly become one of my favourite writers. Thank you, Kennedy, for the recommendation.

Frog Music by Emma Donoghue

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Well, Oprah certainly enjoyed it more than I did, but I didn’t not like it. I just didn’t love it. I should have just sat down and read it in one sitting, but I don’t think I cared enough about the characters or the story to do so. All in all, though, it was a decent read. And LOOK at that cover.

No. 10 on my challenge. I’ve always wanted to visit San Francisco.