The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

threemusketeers-dumasLike most things in my life, my love for Dumas’ famous musketeers stems from a Disney movie.

Starring the thespian talents of Kiefer Sutherland (Lordy, that voice), Oliver Platt, Charlie Sheen (long before he had tiger blood coursing through his veins), and the hunka hunka burnin’ love that was a twenty-three-year-old Chris O’Donnell as D’Artagnan, the 1993 version of the Three Musketeers is a rip roarin’, family-friendly interpretation of the classic French novel that I now know does a marvellous job of introducing the infamous musketeers as Dumas first portrayed them—brave, loyal, and chivalrous, with rapier wit and hella impressive skills with a sword (which, fun fact, would have been a rapier). I watched that movie over, and over, and over, and over, and have since enjoyed every big- and small-screen adaptation I’ve seen—especially the recently concluded BBC television series, which I could not get enough of. So you can imagine my delight (and relief) when I loved the book just as much as I have all the adaptions. I guess there’s just something about a pack of unbeatable besties who would lay down their lives for loyalty and honour that warms the cockles of my heart.

No. 12 on my challenge. Originally serialized as Les Trois Mousquetaires in the French newspaper Le Siècle between March and July 1844, the first English translation was produced in 1846 by William Barrow and is still in print today.

Quoted: The Three Musketeers

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D’Artagnan, the original playa:

Do not depend upon me, madame, for the next meeting; since my convalescence I have so many affairs of this kind on my hands, that I am forced to regulate them a little. When your turn comes, I shall have the honour to inform you of it. I kiss your hands.

Poor Lady DeWinter (ha!).

Bookish Alphabet

This seemed like fun, so I stole it from HiddenStaircase. It’s rather self explanatory.

Author You’ve Read The Most Books From
Either Janet Evanovich or Sandra Brown. Don’t judge me. I am a voracious reader of all sorts.

Best Sequel Ever
A Wolf at the Table by Augusten Burroughs. Though technically not a sequel, it was the second book of his that I read about his family, and it is amazing. The portrait he paints of his father is chilling. And yet, I read Look Me in the Eye by his older brother John Elder Robison and, according to him, their father is totally sane. Nonetheless, they’re both great books.

Currently Reading
Unabrow: Misadventures of a Late Bloomer by Una LaMarche. It’s absolutely hilarious. Also: a manuscript for work, Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt, and The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley, though I admit I haven’t picked up either of the last two in a while.

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